Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: for Ruby Tuesday

I won't be including any male Ruby-throated Hummingbird photos in this post, with their beautiful ruby coloured throats, for if I wanted to, the only place I could find them would be in my photo archives. It is the male of this species that migrates first while the female and this season's young stay behind, delaying their departure for a bit longer. The males have already left. In fact I had thought all the humming -birds had probably gone and I had taken my feeders down. It was only after I spied one last week, feeding in my garden, that I put them back up again. I purposely look for it now, each day expecting not to see it, but every morning now for the past week I find it is still here, including this morning, hurrying to my replenished feeders for sustenance.
These must be hardy little creatures, the ones still reported being seen in the province, for they have endured some very cold nights recently. Last week there had been frost warnings for two nights, with the temperatures dipping down in some areas to freezing or nearly so. Another sign of the changing seasons to be seen is my neighbour's woodpile, newly delivered, now colouring the background of the photo above.
These little hummingbirds are feeding long hours and as the early evening light diminishes, the photo above shows one still feeding. Most Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have already left and I expect this one to do so very soon also.

Fly away little bird and may you reach your southern, winter home safely. Farewell.
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To check out other Ruby Tuesday postings, just click HERE, or click on the Ruby on the side bar. My appreciative thanks to Mary/the teach for hosting this site.

17 comments:

bobbie said...

The perfect choice for Ruby Tuesday.

Nice to leave your feeders up to watch stragglers. But they will be feeding mostly on insects now for protein to prepare for their migration. Their ability to survive storms and cold just amazes me.

Mary said...

It's always confusing to know when to take down the feeders. They stay fairly late here because our weather is pretty mild all the way through October and early November. I've got some of the ones on the move now fighting over my feeders and one feeder got blown down in the recent winds and broke just when I need it! Ann, I had a warbler yesterday that I was hoping you might look at and try to identify. I see so few and you see so many!

Your EG Tour Guide said...

I'm surprised hummingbirds are still around central Ontario too. The males left weeks ago. The females have to stay to rear the young ones until they are strong enough to fly the distance.

me ann my camera said...

mary:
Your beautiful warbler is a first winter Magnolia Warbler. Sorry for missing that yesterday, I had visited your beautiful quilt blog and left a couple of comments there instead. Also I had linked your quilt blog to my blog as well.

bobbie:
They must be hardy little creatures and how wonderful that they have an alternative food supply to rely upon.

eg tour guide:
Isn't it wonderful in nature how the mothering instinct remains as such a strong bond until the young can survive on their own.

kjpweb said...

Good ones - hope I will get some now, that you send 'em down here! ;)
Cheers, Klaus

NW Nature Nut said...

All of our migratory hummers, Rufous, are gone now. My mom was just telling me she hasn't seen any either (she's up in the mountains.) We still have our Anna's though, they stay here year round.
Seems like they would just arrive down south, and have to start back north!

Mary said...

Ann: Thanks for the help with the Warbler. You saw that neck band and I didn't. Great to know I saw a "lifer" for my list! Thanks for linking my quilt blog, although I'll be a bit embarrassed when I get around to some of the beginner stuff that doesn't look so good :-)

Raven said...

What a nice post. I'm always astonished at how hardy all nature's tiny creatures are... and how resourceful. Glad you put the feeders back up.

Deborah Godin said...

I had a female (or juvvie) ruby-throat check out my handing basket yesterday. It's the first hummer I've seen here (S Ontario, Point Pelee area) since moving here in
'05, so it was a real thrill.

Dianne said...

Your feeders are works of art. I've learned so much about birds and nature from bloggers like you. thanks!!

Bobbie in Hawaii said...

Hummingbirds are such dear little creatures. And what could be better for Ruby Tuesday than Ruby-throated hummingbirds?! Terrific.

Ruth said...

I have never had a hummingbird visit a feeder so I don't put them up any more. I saw a female on a trail yesterday amongst the wild flowers. I didn't realize the males left earlier. They are not easy to photograph when they are moving. Great post.

Dar's Foto Faze said...

Hummingbirds are amazing. Thank you for sharing.

Michelle's Rambling Woods said...

I still have my feeders and hummers and it's getting cold in Buffalo..

2sweetnsaxy said...

This was a great post for Ruby Tuesday. I haven't spent much time in my yard and I've missed watching the hummingbirds. :-(

April said...

Beautiful hummingbird pictures! Our hummingbirds have gone already (the last one left around the beginning of the month). They have such a long journey from where we are in central B.C. I miss them.

Kay said...

I just love the hummingbird photos! I wish we could have them here in Hawaii.